Art made of salt

March 31, 2012 § 2 Comments

Creativity has no limit, no borders, no specific medium. Each artist chooses his medium to express himself, to convey meaning or even to ease the pain. For Japanese artist Motoi Yamamoto‘s his medium of choice is salt (more precisely tons of salt) and his story is a little bit different. He builds giant sculptures entirely out of salt and creates incredibly salt maze floor installations to commemorate his sister, who died at the age of 24 from brain cancer.

He perhaps found the healing power of salt, since, as alice says in My Modern Met “salt has a special place in the death rituals of Japan, and is often handed out to people at the end of funerals, so they can sprinkle it on themselves to ward off evil”.

As a way to deal with grief or not, we can’t stop staring and admiring his pieces of art.

The following sculptural salt staircase called Utsusemi reflects on the devastating effects of earthquakes in his own country.

At least, we won’t turn into a pillar of salt like Lot’s wife just by looking at these amazing pieces. See more after the jump

« Read the rest of this entry »

A fountain of time

September 15, 2011 § Leave a comment

A fountain at Osaka Station City which serves as a clock.

A fountain of time, whose minutes passes in beautiful patterns of words, numbers, flowers and pictures.

Pretty amazing, don’t you think?

via Design Taxi

See also:

A high-speed rail with a view

August 9, 2011 § Leave a comment

New Transit Yurikamome (新交通ゆりかもめ, formally the Tokyo Waterfront New Transit Waterfront Line, 東京臨海新交通臨海線): the first Tokyo transit line to be completely automated, which runs solely on computers and connects Odaiba to the mainland, passing through the Rainbow Bridge.

Photographer Appura Pai captured this journey with his long-exposure shots in the new high-speed rail.

See more photos after the jump « Read the rest of this entry »

On the road all around the world

May 22, 2011 § 1 Comment

Does a book cover always reflect the essence of the book itself? And how the artistic outcome of the cover changes when the same book is translated in other languages? Check out some vintage book covers of Jack Kerouac’s “On the Road”  from all around the world.

First edition, 1957

Portugal

Super long list of book covers follows after the jump « Read the rest of this entry »

Read it elsewhere

April 8, 2011 § Leave a comment

Mostly things from the past in this selection of links:

  • “I first had a version of this at a Japanese monastery during a silent retreat—don’t ask, it’s a long story” and other pretentious quotes from Gwyneth Paltrow’s cookbook – eater
  • Truly interesting: what is newsgathering, what is curating, what is piracy? – boingboing
  • Nostalgia: Commodore 64 is back on the market (same exterior, new processor) – New York Times
  • In other retro news, 100 Atari games come to the iPhone and iPad – boingboing
  • And in other iPad news, here is a gallery of the best iPad self-portraits – mashable
  • 600 year old stone markers Japan offer tsunami advice, like: “Always be prepared for unexpected tsunamis. Choose life over your possessions and valuables.” – GOOD.is

Japan Tsunami Warning Stone

Read it elsewhere

April 5, 2011 § Leave a comment

Quick links:

  • “If every single bee disappeared…humanity would also die out within four years” – good.is
  • An ode to Japanese creativity – Core77
  • The biggest egoists on Twitter – uproxx
  • The emotion vending machine – The Creators Project
  • When to drop Google and prefer some other search engine – Lifehacker
  • The best April Fool prank: the cartridge that turns every film camera to digital – re35 via popphoto
  • This is what the world would look like if every country’s area was proportionate to its population – I love charts

world map: countries scaled to population

Read it elsewhere

April 1, 2011 § Leave a comment

Some bad news, but mostly good news and a positive vibe:

  • Where do the young and educated want to live? (infograph) – GOOD.IS
  • Tragic irony: Japanese tsunami survivors sheltered in a nuclear power plant – boingboing
  • In the mean time, it’s a new, carefree dawn for the wildlife at Chernobyl (audio) – gruenrekorder via boing boing
  • TweetWhen is a web app that tells you when your tweets get the most retweets (we do on fridays around 5pm) – TweetWhen
  • Kinda creepy: Google to launch app that scans a face and then finds the person’s google profile (including their contact details) – mashable
  • Honest, down-to-earth, inspiring advice: “how to steal like an artist (9 other things that nobody told me)” – austin kleon via drawn
  • Now I feel old. An exhibition to celebrate South Park’s 15th birthday – lost at E minor

South Park Art

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