A poem for April

April 1, 2013 § 1 Comment

I imagine my love
breathing with the lungs of all things
and it reaches me
as poetry
of roses or dust

speaks softly to everything
and whispers its news to the universe
the way the wind and sun do
when they split nature’s breast
or pour the ink of day
on the earth’s book

Adonis from Beginnings of the Body, Ends of the Sea (translated by Khaled Mattawa)

Tilda sleeping

March 24, 2013 § 1 Comment

Happening now!

Visitors at the MoMA today will be surprised to see Tilda Swinton taking a nap inside a glass box.

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It’s part of the Maybe installation that Tilda has been performing in Museums since 1995. Tilda just shows up and takes a nap – nobody knows when or where inside the museum, not even MoMA staff. So, if you’re around check it out now!

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This is what MoMA had to say about it:

An integral part of The Maybe’s incarnation at MoMA in 2013 is that there is no published schedule for its appearance, no artist’s statement released, no museum statement beyond this brief context, no public profile or image issued. Those who find it chance upon it for themselves, live and in real—shared—time: now we see it, now we don’t.

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via Gothamist

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Words on their own

February 19, 2013 § Leave a comment

When words and letters acquires a life of their own. Ebon Heath liberates the letters from their frame, the printed page and creates laser-cut sculptures of the letters, giving them a three-dimensional existence with which viewers can actually interact.  His typography sculptures, called Stereo.type, become a magical transformation of the written word into what he describes as a “new language of physical type.”EbonHeath1

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I will not make any more boring art

October 7, 2012 § Leave a comment

A portrait of the godfather of conceptual art, John Baldessari. A brilliant video for its inspiration, editing, graphic design and, of course, for its narration by Tom Waits.

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Documenting the human body

May 29, 2012 § 2 Comments

There are cases that nudity is no longer provocative or shocking, but a manifestation of the human condition. In Spencer Tunick’s photographs, a nude body stops being just a nude body and becomes part of the landscape.

More than 15 years, Spencer Tunick has been gathering hundreds or thousands of volunteers and photographing in public places, such as the Zocalo Square in Mexico City, the Dead Sea in Israel, in museums, or in the streets all around the world,  challenging our notions of nudity and purity.

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The DNA of a city

April 2, 2012 § Leave a comment

What appears as abstract shapes and colors at first sight, it could actually be an artist’s point of view of a city, let’ s say. That’s the case of Chinese artist Lu Xinjian, who based on aerial views from Google Earth, creates his own maps of major cities across the world in his series entitled City DNA.

See if you can recognize your city:

 Highlight to see city name: Moscow.

The colors of each piece represents the colors of each city and its national flag.Highlight to see city name: New York.

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Art made of salt

March 31, 2012 § 2 Comments

Creativity has no limit, no borders, no specific medium. Each artist chooses his medium to express himself, to convey meaning or even to ease the pain. For Japanese artist Motoi Yamamoto‘s his medium of choice is salt (more precisely tons of salt) and his story is a little bit different. He builds giant sculptures entirely out of salt and creates incredibly salt maze floor installations to commemorate his sister, who died at the age of 24 from brain cancer.

He perhaps found the healing power of salt, since, as alice says in My Modern Met “salt has a special place in the death rituals of Japan, and is often handed out to people at the end of funerals, so they can sprinkle it on themselves to ward off evil”.

As a way to deal with grief or not, we can’t stop staring and admiring his pieces of art.

The following sculptural salt staircase called Utsusemi reflects on the devastating effects of earthquakes in his own country.

At least, we won’t turn into a pillar of salt like Lot’s wife just by looking at these amazing pieces. See more after the jump

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